University of Colorado Hospital: Small Renovation, Big Impact


Exciting developments in healthcare happen frequently at the University of Colorado Hospital (UCH) located on the Anschutz Medical Campus. U.S. Engineering’s latest project for the hospital’s critical care wing is no exception. Over the course of five months, locker room space on the hospital’s third floor was transformed into a state-of-the-art Electrophysiology (EP) Lab with technology like no other.

The EP Lab’s primary function is to carry out procedures for patients with complex cardiac arrhythmias. The old space was renovated to accommodate installation of technology and equipment by Stereotaxis and Phillips, whose mission is to enable safe and effective treatment of arrhythmias with cutting edge machinery.  Their robotic navigation system provides more precise placement than what is possible with a human hand and reduces procedure times from seven hours to three; an outcome that positively impacts patients and hospital staff. Even more notable, UCH is the first location in the state of Colorado to offer this innovative procedure.

To accomplish the transformation was a challenge, but one U.S. Engineering’s team handled with care.  The project team had to safely demolish and renovate existing systems to install new sheet metal, air terminal boxes, and medical gas to accommodate the new space. Working closely with member companies Haselden Construction and Encore Electric, the team worked diligently to perform the tasks with limited down time and no disruption to hospital operations or patient care.

“As with any renovation in an active hospital, there were obstacles, but the issues were addressed with the skill and professionalism of the entire team. A relationship has grown over the past 2.5 years with this team, which is evidenced by our ability to finish each other’s sentences,” says Robert Kumley, U.S. Engineering Project Manager.

A major challenge was fitting the ductwork into the tight space, as the EP Lab has a special ceiling that takes up more than normal ceiling space. Old 86”x30” duct was replaced with new 100”x18” duct to allow space for the new booms and equipment.  By working quickly and efficiently on a Sunday, the team was able to shut down the AHU and replace the duct that feeds the procedure rooms on the entire third floor without disruption to patients or staff.

The new EP Lab was unveiled to doctors, nurses and staff in August and the first procedure was completed shortly thereafter.